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Faculty of Humanities Teaching & Learning Office

Blended Learning Examples

Using a Tablet PC and Microsoft OneNote to deliver lectures and provide feedback

Using a Tablet PC and Microsoft OneNote to deliver lectures and provide feedback

See it in action:

  • T&L forum 2010: Using a Tablet PC and OneNote in Lectures and for feedback

    T&L forum 2010: Using a Tablet PC and OneNote in Lectures and for feedback

    Adam Ozanne (ECON) demonstrates and discusses his innovative use of a tablet PC and Microsoft One-Note for engaging lecture delivery and student feedback.

  • Showcase 2013: an overview of using a Tablet PC and Microsoft OneNote

    This presentation [PDF] was given at the January 2013 Humanities Showcase.

  • Introductory Mathematics

    Introductory Mathematics

    Screencast walk-through of Adam's Introductory Mathematics course.

School
Social Sciences
Course
ECON10061 Introductory Mathematics
Themes
Assessment, Feedback and marking, Teaching Awards

For a number of years now, Adam Ozanne has used his Toshiba Tablet PC to deliver lectures on 'Introductory Maths'and to provide students with a sample of anonymised feedback on their weekly assignments.

Students download lecture notes each week from Blackboard. The notes contain gaps such as unfinished mathematical problems, diagrams etc. which Adam completes in lectures using the Tablet's touch screen and pen.

Each week he selected ten examples of student homework, photocopied, anonymised and scanned it, marked the work on the Tablet, then put the corrected and marked work on Blackboard. Students have commented positively on this feedback.

For a walk-through of Adam's Blackboard course, please click the Introductory Mathematics link to the right.

You can also watch Adam's Jan 2013 Showcase presentation below:

Benefits:

This teaching method has several advantages:

  • the technique combines the clarity of Powerpoint presentations with the interaction and spontaneity of "chalk and talk", while pdf copies of annotated lecture notes can be placed on Blackboard for students who miss lectures.
  • students do not have to scribble constantly to keep up, but can listen and think about the lecture, while having to put pen regularly to paper (fill in the gaps)helps concentration.
  • samples of anonymised feedback (uploaded to Bb) given on their weekly assignments gives students a better idea of what is expected in terms of accuracy and clarity in their answers, as well as the standard of work required for a First class, 2.1, 2.2 degree.