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Faculty of Humanities Teaching & Learning Office

eLearning Summer School 2013

summer school iconEducational processes are changing. What does this mean for you?

In 2013 the Humanities eLearning team held a Summer School, following the summer Showcase. The event took place between 1-5 July.

In this week long series of workshops and discussions, we looked at how the online environment could be used to improve student experience, change academic practice, and perhaps make life easier. Aimed at those who’ve wondered how to go about making their online courses more interesting and relevant, or who wanted to explore ways of directing students to a wider range of open resources, the Summer School provided the opportunity to discuss potential methods and initiatives with colleagues.

Below is the timetable. If you are interested in finding out more about what happened at these sessions, or would like to follow up any of the topics with a member of the eLearning team, please email elearning@manchester.ac.uk.

Registration

Note: You do not have to attend the Learning Design workshop in order to book onto the other sessions over the rest of the week. Individual members of staff can book onto any number of sessions, but we can only run the Design Workshops for course teams.

To book any of the sessions go to our training calendar (note: online bookings close 3 days before each session - in this case, or if you have any other difficulties using the online booking system, please email linda.irish@manchester.ac.uk with details of the session(s) you'd like to attend).

Overall Timetable (details of each session can be found underneath)

Start time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
10:00

1:1 bookable session

10:00-11:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

Mobile @ Manchester

10:00-11:30
A3.7 Ellen Wilkinson
Cath Dyson, Phil Styles & Ian Miller

1:1 bookable session

10:00-11:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

Open Educational Resources

10:00-11:30
5.209 University Place
Andrew Gold, Max Jones & Jade Kelsall

Lecture Capture - what does it mean for you?

10:00-11:30
2.217 University Place
Stuart Phillipson & Phil Styles

Possibilities in Teaching Online

10:00-11:30
B8 MBS East
Peter Lythgoe & Roger Hewitt

10:30

eLearning Design Workshop (HeLD) 1 Part 1

10:30-12:30
Ellen Wilkinson C1.51
Helen Perkins & Anna Verges-Bausili

eLearning Design Workshop (HeLD) 1 Part 2

10:30-12:30
Ellen Wilkinson C1.51
Helen Perkins & Anna Verges-Bausili

 

Embedding Video Workshop

10:00-11:30
B3.17 Ellen Wilkinson
Linda Irish

 

 
11:00

1:1 bookable session

11:00-12:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

1:1 bookable session

11:00-12:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

 

1:1 bookable session

11:00-12:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

1:1 bookable session

11:00-12:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

11:30

 

 

Copyright Guidance Service & Digitisation Service

11:30-12:30
Main Library, Red 3.1
Claire Hodkinson & Martin Snelling

 

 
12:00    

Media Production in Teaching

12:00-13:00
1.003 Roscoe
Johannes Sjoberg

14:00

eLearning Design Workshop (HeLD) 2 Part 1

14:00-16:00
Ellen Wilkinson C1.51
Helen Perkins & Anna Verges-Bausili

Quick Tips for Bb9 Course Design

14:00-15:30
W2.19 Samuel Alexander
Roger Hewitt

1:1 bookable session

14:00-15:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

eLearning Design Workshop (HeLD) 2 Part 2

14:00-16:00
Ellen Wilkinson C1.51
Helen Perkins & Anna Verges-Bausili

Student Views on Learning Technologies

14:00-15:30
Hanson Room, Humanities Bridgeford Street
Cath Dyson

1:1 bookable session

14:00-15:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

 

Advanced Grademark Workshop

14:00-15:30
W2.19 Samuel Alexander
Anna Verges

Enhancing the Learner Experience

14:00-15:00
5.212 University Place
Gary Motteram

 

Quick Tips for Bb9 Course Design

14:00-15:30
B3.17 Ellen Wilkinson
Roger Hewitt

15:00

1:1 bookable session

15:00-16:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

1:1 bookable session

15:00-16:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

 

1:1 bookable session

15:00-16:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

1:1 bookable session

15:00-16:00
C1.44 Ellen Wilkinson or own office

15:30

Documentary Film Making

15:30-16:30
S2.9 Samuel Alexander
Julie-Marie Strange

       

 

Revamp your course on our eLearning Design workshops - Helen Perkins and Anna Verges (Humanities eLearning)

We’ll start the week with a set of Learning Design workshops. In these new and experimental workshops come and explore a different way of designing teaching and learning, and embedding eLearning activities across a whole course. Suitable for both face to face/blended and distance course units we will work exclusively with your course team to:

  • Look at how and what we teach face to face and online
  • Develop a course plan focussing on student activity
  • Help you identify appropriate activities and eLearning tools
  • Provide guidance on how to develop online activities and assessment

After the workshops we’ll arrange for continuing face-face and online support as well as one-one sessions with the eLearning team to help you develop your course. NB we will not be creating eLearning activities during the workshops but will ensure you have the support you need from us to be able to do this.

Please book on as a course team including as many of those involved in the teaching of the course.

There are 2 x 2hr workshops to attend during the week, plus a pre-meeting which one of the eLearning team will arrange with you before the summer school week.

Book the Learning Design Workshop

The rest of the week..

Presentation/update and discussion sessions    

Possibilities in Teaching Online - Peter Lythgoe (MBS eLearning) and Roger Hewitt (Humanities eLearning)

This session is about small course/small group teaching. If you are interested in taking advantage of existing and developing tools to enhance communication and interaction with your students, come along and talk with other members of staff about how you could do this. The session will be based around a presentation on using YouTube Channels, looking at students creating content with Web 2.0 tools, and finally exploring the promise of augmented reality, which is already widely used in industry.

Mobile @ Manchester - Cath Dyson, Phil Styles (Humanities eLearning) & Ian Miller (Life Sciences eLearning)

A session to explore how mobile learning can present opportunities for teaching and learning and student support. We’ll be particularly demonstrating and using the Blackboard mobile app which is available across a number of tablet and phone devices.

If you have a device bring it but there will phone and tablets available (both Apple and Android devices) to try out, access your courses on and compare.

During the session we’ll:

Ian Miller will also talk about the Mobile Learning Project in FLS, the aims of which are to: give every student full mobile access to teaching material; enhance teaching experience using mobile devices (digital quality, interactive, multimedia); create enriched teaching content. He'll also do a quick demonstration of Nearpod.

There will be time in the session to discuss and ask any questions

Enhancing the learner experience in (distance) higher education - Gary Motteram (Education)

Distance learning practitioners have argued for some time that there are three crucial elements that make up effective and engaging learning: cognitive, teaching and social presence (Garrison and Anderson, 2011). This effectively means: a body of ideas to engage with and learn about and to simulate debate discussion and critical review; support from teachers or course participants to scaffold this engagement (Wood, et al., 1976); and a personal commitment to become part of this community of learning.

On courses that I teach at Manchester I use a variety of open source tools: blogs, wikis and synchronous tools like Skype or Big Blue Button alongside those provide to me by the university: Blackboard and Adobe Connect.

Blackboard in my teaching is effectively a portal to materials that I keep elsewhere and I also use Blackboard forums for asynchronous discussion. I also use Grademark/TII for submission of assignments and marking. I keep my materials in open source tools so that they remain an Open Education Resource (OER) for the students during the course and on graduation. I mainly use wikis for this now, because the students can also contribute to keeping these materials up to date, although I also use blogs. I make more and more use of synchronous tools to promote social presence, but also a range of e-tivities (Salmon, 2011) in the forums.

I strongly believe that this kind of model is also valid in blended education and certainly use a similar set of tools to support in-Manchester classes. My belief has been supported recent publications in this area, e.g. Anderson and Vaughan (2007).

This presentation will then provide an introduction to some of my teaching and the courses I produce.

  • Anderson, T. and Vaughan, N.D. (2007) Blended learning in higher education: Framework, principles and guidelines. San Francisco: Josey-Bass.
  • Garrison, D. and Anderson, T. (2011) E-Learning in the 21st Century: A Framework for Research and Practice (2nd Edition). London: Taylor & Francis.
  • Salmon, G. (2011) E-moderating - The Key to Teaching and Learning Online (3rd Edition). London: Taylor & Francis.
  • Wood, D. J., Bruner, J. S., & Ross, G. (1976) The role of tutoring in problem solving. Journal of Child Psychiatry and Psychology, 17(2), 89-100.

Finding Resources for your Teaching - what’s the deal with Open Educational Resources?- Andrew Gold (Humanities eLearning), Max Jones (SALC, History), Jade Kelsall (Library)

This session will help you find online teaching resources including a presentation about what OERs are and how they can be accessed and used, and feedback from Max Jones about this experience of using OERs in his teaching. There will also be input from the Library including an update on some findings from their scoping of existing OER activity across campus, and their potential policy recommendations. There will be plenty of time for discussion.

Documentary film-making: student generated resources - Julie-Marie Strange (SALC, History)

Julie-Marie will talk about documentary film-making on the MA History, describing the genesis for this approach, and exploring barriers and benefits. Consideration will be given to the impact this practical experience has had on students' academic understanding and their (perceived) employability in terms of practical skills and confidence. There will be opportunity to discuss how this approach might work for other courses.

Media Production in Teaching - Johannes Sjoberg (SALC, Drama)

Johannes will talk about a 40cr final year UG unit, “Docu-fiction”, where social anthropology and drama intersect. Consideration will be given to the impact this practical experience has had on students' academic understanding and their (perceived) employability in terms of practical skills and confidence.

The Lecture Capture Project: what does it mean for you? - Stuart Phillipson (Application Support and Development) and Phil Styles (Humanities eLearning)

This is an opportunity to hear about how lecture capture works in practice, find out about the underpinning policy, and hear some feedback from those who have already used the system. There will be time to discuss how this might impact on your teaching, and how lecture capture could be used to support a blended learning approach.

Student Views on Learning Technologies - Cath Dyson (Humanities eLearning)

This session will present findings for a consultation exercise conducted by the Faculty eLearning team on ‘Student Views of Learning Technologies’. We’ll also be using and referring to other information we have from students including feedback from our Best on Blackboard competition and the work Schools are doing on online submission and marking of assessments as well as the Unit Surveys.

We’ll have the opportunity to share experiences of students’ views and discuss how we use this feedback to impact teaching and learning practice and policy.

Practical Workshops    

Bb9 Quick Tips for Course Design (Roger Hewitt - Humanities eLearning)

Advanced Turnitin (Anna Verges - Humanities eLearning)

Embedding Video into your Bb9 course (Linda Irish - Humanities eLearning)

Other sessions    

New Copyright Guidance Service, Creative Commons and Digitisation Service - (Claire Hodkinson - Copyright Guidance Service, and Martin Snelling - Digitisation Service)

The session will cover:

  1. Introduction: Legislation vs technology. Copyright and Educational defences plus Licences. Compliance and Responsibility. Risk Management (Axis of Risk).
  2. Demonstration of Libguide
  3. Creative Commons
  4. Best practice – Do's and Don'ts
  5. Digitisation and the CLA licence

Top tips for Tii & Student tracking - 2 x 15 minute presentations with time for Q&A

Collaborative Tools and Embedding Video - 2 x 15 minute presentations with time for Q&A

1:1 Sessions    

We're running a number of bookable one hour 1:1 sessions where you can come and get some support on developing a particular aspect of your course (one slot available per person, or up to 3 people together on the same topic - please email after booking if there will be more than one of you).

These sessions are not intended as training sessions, staff are expected to be familiar with Bb9 and the basics of any particular tool or function of Bb9 they wish to use. The kinds of things we might expect to cover in these sessions are:

  • Taking a learning outcome as the starting point, and discussing what options might be best suited to achieve that;
  • Building on existing use of tools in your Bb9 course and exploring them in more depth;
  • Working to resolve an issue with or improve the method of delivery of your learning material.

Last Reviewed: June 2013